Saturday, May 23, 2009

Thai Visual Dictionary - Basic Anatomy


รูม่านตา(ruu-mâan-taa)-pupils
หนังตา(nǎng-taa)-eyelids
ตา(taa)-eyes
หู(hŭŭ)-ears
รูจมูก(ruu-ja-mùuk)-nostrils
ผม(phŏm)-hair
แก้ม(gâem)-cheeks
หัว(hŭa)-head
หน้าผาก(nââ-phààk)-forehead
คิ้ว(kíw)-eyebrows
ขนตา(kŏn-taa)-eyelashes
จมูก(ja-mùuk)-nose
ปาก(pààk)-mouth
ฟัน(fan)-teeth
ริมฝีปาก(rim-fĭ-pààk)-lips
คอ(kaw)-neck
คาง(kaang)-chin

Sunday, May 10, 2009

Devanagari and Its Tai, Burmese, and Khmer Correspondents


This table shows the comparison among Devanagari, Burmese, and Tai, including Tai Tham (Lanna and Khün) and Thai scripts.

And after looking at this, I think Tai Tham script and Burmese script really resemble Khmer script perhaps even more than Thai. The Burmese and Tai Tham correspondents of the Thai ฆ ด ท ธ ฒ ณ บ พ ม ย ร ล ห look really similar to those of Khmer.



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Friday, May 8, 2009

Tai Languages Written in Their Scripts

And this is my name "Alif" written in different Tai scripts.

Shan Alphabet

The Shan alphabet was probably derived from, or at least influenced by, the Old Mon alphabet.
Shan alphabet is used to write the Shan language, a Tai language closely related to Thai and Lao. Moreover, many Shan speakers live in Shan State, Burma (Myanmar), and there is also a large Shan population in Northern Thailand (formerly Lanna Kingdom, an independent Tai kingdom whose mother tongue is closely related to Thai and Lao).

You can download Shan unicode font here.





Vowels (in red)


Shan writing in action:
Shan info.

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